Is time up on streaks?

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Laurel O’Brien

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Is time up on streaks?

The hourglass has become symbol of stress that reminds avid Snapchatters to hurry and send their streaks. Maybe they have sent a picture of their forehead with the phrase “streaks sb” or received a black-screen picture with a red “s” scribbled on it. While some care more about streaks than grades, others see them as annoying.  

“I just like talking to all of my friends throughout the day through Snapchat every day, and that’s how we keep our streak,’’ Julia Garab, junior, said.  

A ‘streak’ on Snapchat is when someone exchanges snaps back and forth with another for several consecutive days. Some people have streaks as low as three days, while others have streak of almost three years. 

“I have a streak of 1073 with my best friend, and it is easy to keep up with because I find myself snapchatting her every day,” Annie Arnold, freshman, said.  

Some people send their streaks every morning and night, and other Snapchat users send a picture to their recent contacts, just to catch up with the people they Snap the most.   

“I send them [streaks] once a day except for on weekends when I don’t send them at all, and I don’t have a streaks list; it’s usually just my recent snaps, but those are all my close friends,” Carson Reeder, sophomore, said.  

Other Snapchat users do not care about streaks at all. Typically, the only way they would have a streak is if they answer to certain people daily 

I think Snapchat streaks are pointless. I use Snapchat to talk to people and not just have a streak,” Logan Melnyk, sophomore, said.  

It seems today that students are getting distracted during class, while they are spending most of their time on their phone.  

“I am on Snapchat every class, and it distracts me from getting my work done,” Meg Lance, freshman, said.  

Teachers struggle with distracted students whose grades are dropping because they are on their phones during class. 

“Students have been on their phone, but even before Snapchat, students would still be on their phone during class,” William Hall, chorus teacher, said.  

Some teachers do not allow phones in their classes. 

“There is a direct correlation between struggling students and phone use, so I don’t allow phones during class which helps students focus and engage with learning,” Marsha Loversky, Advanced Composition teacher, said.  

Streaks can be a nuisance and a hassle, but to many people Snapchat streaks are prized possessions that will be kept no matter the costs.  

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